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Alternative network concepts (archive)

This page details an earlier version of Metro’s proposal to change bus service after Link comes to Capitol Hill and the University District. For the most current information, please see "Adopted Changes".

In March, we gathered feedback about two alternative network concepts for the areas that will be affected by the start of Link service in 2016. You can learn more about those alternatives below. These concepts did not reflect new service that will be funded by the City of Seattle starting in June and September 2015.

Differences

Alternative 1

Aimed to create a consolidated, frequent network of service:

  • Consolidated service into fewer routes on major streets where ridership is highest, for more productivity and efficiency.
  • All places where service remained would have service frequencies of 15 minutes or better. (Currently, most routes in northeast Seattle come every 30 minutes.) Increased frequency would mean less wait time when catching a bus or transferring between services, and a more dependable travel time.
  • Offered more new connections between destinations we heard are important to riders.
  • With fewer transfer points, riders would be concentrated in fewer places. Metro could focus resources on amenities at these locations, creating safer, more comfortable places for riders to connect to or between services.
  • Took the uncertainty and pre-planning out of choosing to ride. Riders would know where to go to catch the bus and would not have to worry about when the bus is coming.
  • Riders in some areas would have to travel farther to reach transit.

Alternative 2

Involved more modest changes. It assumed that riders will switch to Link light rail only where the travel time benefit is greatest, but still responded to shifts in the transit market:

  • Maintained more geographic coverage. For the most part, riders could reach transit the same way they do today, without having to travel farther.
  • Riders could choose between having a one-seat ride between major destinations or transferring.
  • Service would be less frequent, and wait times for transfers would be longer.
  • Offered some new connections between destinations we heard are important to riders.

Similarities

Both alternative concepts…

  • Were designed using Metro's Service Guidelines and public input from our first round of outreach last November.
  • Aimed to provide a more reliable trip time for bus riders with a transfer to Link light rail, which would provide congestion-free  trips (Capitol Hill-downtown Seattle in four minutes;  Husky Stadium-downtown Seattle in eight minutes, and Capitol Hill-University of Washington in four minutes).
  • Did not reflect new service that will be funded by the City of Seattle starting in June and September 2015.

Maps: networks and travel times

Explore routes in detail

Specific routes

Choose a button to see detailed information about what would happen to that route under the two alternatives.

Interactive map

Laptop with interactive map on the screen

Compare the two alternative concepts using our interactive map and see how service would look at different times of day under the two alternatives.

Open the map

Project contact

DeAnna Martin
Community Relations Planner
Send DeAnna an email
or call 206-477-3835

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